Logitech Spotlight Reimagines The Art of Presentations

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It’s been eight years since Logitech introduced a wireless remote to advance presentation slides. What could possibly change in eight years? Plenty. In fact, the new Spotlight by Logitech will transform your presentations, offering a powerful and personal tool that will help you stand out in business and in your career.

Sixty percent of business professionals say they present regularly. But while 1 billion presentations are given every year, only 2 million presentation remotes are sold annually. This tells us that many people who should be using remotes to deliver their presentations are going along without one.

After getting an early opportunity to test Spotlight by Logitech, I can tell you that it’s a game-changing tool to deliver presentations confidently and fearlessly.

You see, it’s not just a pointer or a clicker. For example, say goodbye to the red laser-pointer. Instead, Spotlight literally shines a spotlight on the portion of the slide you want to highlight. If an image is small, no problem, just magnify it and make it larger – again, all with the remote in the palm of your hand.

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If you’re playing videos and the volume is too low or too high, again, it’s no problem. Spotlight has gesture control and allows you to adjust the volume without touching your computer. The remote also gives you on-screen cursor control to play and pause videos. There’s no need to break your flow or go anywhere near a mouse or laptop.

I spent much of last week on tour with Logitech. We visited three cities—San Francisco, New York and Boston—and met with dozens of technology reporters and bloggers. They were impressed. According to ZDNET, Spotlight is “an elegant tool for professional presenters.” You can read the entire review here.

 

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Spotlight represents a new standard in presentation control. It’s elegant and comfortable. Every feature is made to empower confident, fearless presenting. Whether you prefer PowerPoint, Prezi or Apple Keynote, Spotlight will transform the way you present. Don’t sell your ideas without one.

For anyone who presents as part of their job – to pitch ideas, engage teams, or inspire employees and customers—the Spotlight wireless presentation remote is an elegant and useful tool that will take your presentation to the next level.

Carmine Gallo is a popular keynote speaker, communication advisor and bestselling author of eight books including The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs, Talk Like TED and The Storyteller’s Secret

Happy Birthday Pope Francis, Master of Metaphor

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In The Storyteller’s Secret I devote an entire chapter to one of the great spiritual leaders of the world, Pope Francis, who turns 80 today. Francis learned his communication skills as a Jesuit seminarian and continues to deliver speeches that rely on the building blocks of narrative to capture attention: metaphor.

Whether he’s comparing greed to “the dung of the devil” or the church as a “field hospital” that must go into the streets to find the spiritually “wounded,” Francis’ speeches are loaded with vivid imagery to make the abstract tangible.

In some speeches Francis will use more than one metaphor in the same sentence:

“For Mother Teresa, mercy was the salt which gave flavor to her work, it was the light which shone in the darkness of the many who no longer had tears to shed for their poverty and suffering.” People who have done evil and know it, live “with a constant itch, with hives that don’t leave them in peace,” he once said. Vanity is “like an osteoporosis of the soul: the bones seem good from the outside, but on the inside they are all ruined.” Some people, argue Francis, are afflicted with “Spiritual Alzheimer’s.”

In April, 2016, Francis released his first major paper on marriage and the family. “Amoris Laetitia” is beautifully written.  Once again, Francis relies on metaphor to communicate the topic. Quoting the psalms, children are “like olive shoots,” full of energy and vitality. Letting them go is like “flying a kite.” When the kite begins to waver, you don’t pull the strings tighter. Instead you give it some slack.

An increasing body of evidence is emerging in the neuroscience literature to support the power of storytelling; specifically, the effectiveness of using analogies to bring abstract concepts to life. Stories work because they activate many parts of our brain. Metaphor and analogies are critical devices to make it happen. Pope Francis is a master of the technique and his speeches are well worth studying.

Carmine Gallo is a popular keynote speaker, best-selling author, and communication advisor for the world’s most admired brands

The Day Tony Robbins Discovered His Gift for Public-Speaking

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A high-school English teacher recognized that Tony Robbins had a skill the student didn’t recognize in himself. Robbins had the gift of moving people with his words. The teacher encouraged Robbins to joins the high school debate team and Robbins’ life—and the lives of millions of his fans—was completely transformed.

Robbins, the world-famous life coach and speaker, recently told me, “I realized public-speaking was a skill and a gift, and that the skill and the gift combined could do some beautiful things. I’ve now been practicing it for 39 years.”

Robbins is quick to point out that gifts must be nurtured, refined and developed, and that’s exactly what he did with his public-speaking skills. At the age of 17, Robbins went to work for personal development coach and speaker, Jim Rohn. Robbins met a another speaker who was clearly resting on his laurels, a person who gave three speeches a month. “If he does three a month, I’ll find a way to book myself for three speeches a day. I’ll talk to the groups nobody wants to talk to” Robbins committed to himself. “People are rewarded in public for what they’ve practiced in private obsessively, intensely, and relentlessly.

According to Tony Robbins, public-speaking skills can be mastered if you’re willing to put in the time and energy.

“You can either drag it out forever and never get good at it, or are you can compress time and concentrate your power,” says Robbins.

Today Tony Robbins is a recognized authority on leadership psychology. He is on the road 200 days a year, speaking to more than 200,000 people and coaching the likes of Bill Clinton, Serena Williams, Marc Benioff and Leonardo DiCaprio, among many other notable leaders in business and entertainment. And while it’s a rare individual who will achieve Robbins’ level of influence, all leaders can learn an important lesson from his life. It’s a theme I’ve reinforced time and again: Leaders cannot inspire unless they’re inspired themselves. Robbins is convinced he’s put on earth to help others live their best lives. He’s a great communicator because he’s on a mission and he’s put in the work to make himself great.

Carmine Gallo is a popular keynote speaker, communication advisor and bestselling author. Tony Robbins is one of the entrepreneurs and leaders who Carmine features in his new book, “The Storyteller’s Secret.”

Joel Osteen’s Secret To Public Speaking

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On Sundays pastor Joel Osteen does something that would give most people a severe case of anxiety. He speaks to 40,000 people who attend services at Lakewood Church in Houston and to millions of others viewing on television in more than 100 countries.

Osteen is the rare individual who sells out stadiums, and he does so without The Rolling Stones or Taylor Swift sharing the stage.

Most observers might assume Osteen was always comfortable with public-speaking. The truth is quite the opposite. In fact, Osteen spent 17 years behind the scenes, working the camera for his father, the late preacher John Osteen. Joel did not see himself as a speaker, he did not feel as though he had the gift to captivate audiences, and he was very nervous about taking the stage. Osteen once told me he got nervous simply reading the church announcements!

“Carmine, when I began preaching I was nervous and intimidated. I’m naturally quiet and reserved. I was bombarded by negative thoughts,” he said.

Osteen made the transformation from shy cameraman to electrifying speaker when he reframed his internal narrative. Osteen admits that his negative self-talk got the better of him. He would repeat these phrases to himself:

You can’t do this, Joel.

You’re too young.

You don’t have the experience.

Nobody is going to come.

It took Osteen at least a year to build up his confidence. How? Joel Osteen hit the ‘delete button’ on negative self-talk, replacing words of defeat with words of victory.

“If I had let those negative thoughts play over and over in my mind, they would have contaminated my confidence, contaminated my self-esteem, and contaminated by future,” Osteen writes in his new bestselling book, Think Better Live Better.

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Nearly every inspiring leader I’ve met has dealt with periods of doubt. They’ve faced doubt about their leadership qualifications, doubt about their public-speaking ability, doubt about their ability to make an impact. Osteen did the right thing. He reframed his internal narrative, changing the dialogue in his head. Words are like seeds, says Osteen. Whatever you say will take root. Make sure the roots you’re planting are strong, empowering, and inspiring.

Joel Osteen is one of the leaders Carmine Gallo features in his new bestselling book, The Storyteller’s Secret: From TED Speakers To Business Legends Why Some Ideas Catch On And Others Don’t (St. Martin’s Press, 2016). 

Storytelling Rocks at Google

Google organized the world’s information and gave people access to it in a few simple clicks. Today, in the same world it transformed, Google has a challenge. If data is freely available, how does a company stand apart from its competitors?

Meet Avinash Kaushik. His official title is Digital Marketing Evangelist, but internally he’s known as Google’s ‘Chief Storyteller.’ He’s THE most passionate executive I’ve ever met on the topic of storytelling and how it can make massive changes in a company’s business.

“My job is to change the way Googlers tell stories,” Kaushik said during my visit to his Google office in Mountain View, California. Along with a team of 75 people, Kaushik holds “Storytelling Rocks” workshops to spread the gospel of storytelling to 4,000 account leads, sales and marketing professionals who are responsible for billions of dollars in annual revenue.

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“Avinash, when people think of Google, they think of search. They think of data. What role does storytelling play?” I asked.

“Storytelling is a powerful way to get our clients to think differently,” says Kaushik.

Kaushik points out that Google provides an immense amount of data to clients who can use the information to make transformative changes in their business. But a data dump will fail to help customers if they can’t make sense of it. That’s where Kaushik and his storytellers step in. “The size and the scope of the change we drive is so big, that I think it is best done with stories,” says Kaushik.

The Google Storytelling Framework

Kaushik has developed a storytelling framework called: Care-Do-Impact. Like everything at Google, it is carefully measured for its effectiveness. Presenters are even given letter grades on how well they perform each step of the framework.

Step 1: Care. Kaushik recommends that a Google sales or marketing professional spend the first 20% of a presentation explaining the amazing “out-of-sight” that could transform the client’s business. An “insight” is a small piece of information that the client might already know; an “out-of-sight” is knowledge that is exclusive to the company making the presentation, information that can radically change a client’s business.

Step 2: Do. Kaushik suggests that a full 50% of the presentation be spent on helping the client or customer understand what they should do with the information. This step requires account leads to understand the clients’ business in a remarkably deep way. “We’re creating a competitive advantage for Google because we will know more about your business than anyone else who comes to see you,” says Kaushik.

Step 3: Impact. The remaining 20% of the presentation is spent explaining the impact of Google’s ‘out-of-sight’ on the customer’s future success. Kaushik leaves room in the presentation (10% of time) for the speaker to be interrupted with questions.

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According to Kaushik, this framework represents a fundamental shift in presenting data. Where many companies overwhelm customers and prospects with mountains of data, a Google pitch must give equal weight to the data and how it will impact the company’s business.

“There is a massive amount of interest among our sales team for storytelling,” says Kaushik. And the way we’re going to accomplish a shift in culture at Google is to make everyone a storyteller. It’s very exciting. How often in your life do you get a chance to change people’s minds? I tell stories that fundamentally change the way you think about something, and that’s exciting.”

Google has recognized the power of storytelling to propel its business forward in the 21st century.  It’s an important lesson all of us should learn if we hope to stand out in an ultra-competitive global marketplace.

Carmine Gallo is  a popular keynote speaker and bestselling author. His new book is “The Storyteller’s Secret: From TED Speakers To Business Legends, Why Some Ideas Catch On And Others Don’t.”